Sunderland legend tackles racism

A group of officials and pupils from New Penshaw Primary School at the Show Racism The Red Card event in Sunderland Civic Centre
A group of officials and pupils from New Penshaw Primary School at the Show Racism The Red Card event in Sunderland Civic Centre
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SUNDERLAND legend Gary Bennett was on the ball at a question-and-answer session to help tackle racism.

The former Black Cats defender was quizzed by youngsters at the Show Racism the Red Card (SRtRC) event on how best to kick the problem into touch.

Gary Bennett answers questions from youngsters at New Penshaw Primary School at the Show racism The Red Card event at Sunderland Civic Centre

Gary Bennett answers questions from youngsters at New Penshaw Primary School at the Show racism The Red Card event at Sunderland Civic Centre

He was joined by former players Curtis Fleming, Dean Gordon and Trevor Benjamin at a series of workshops in Sunderland Civic Centre.

Year 5 pupils from New Penshaw, Hudson Road and Valley Road primary schools took part in a range of activities, including drama, role-play and presentations, to raise awareness of the fight against racism.

Craig Bankhead, North East education manager with SRtRC, said: “The question-and-answer session featured a panel of guests including SRtRC football coaches Curtis Fleming, Gary Bennett, Dean Gordon and Trevor Benjamin.

“Also on the panel were current Newcastle United Women’s captain Sarah Wilson and Sunderland Women’s players Stephanie Bannon and Beck Salicki.”

The children with the best questions were awarded with Sunderland match tickets, a SRtRC Football and T-shirt.

Others who asked a question also received a SRtRC football, goody bag and posters signed by the panel.

“We want to thank all the young people who participated in the event and everyone who made it possible,” said Craig.

“We work with thousands of young people from Sunderland’s schools every year to help tackle racism in society.

“They are always very proud when we tell them that Sunderland was the first council to support the campaign’s work in schools.”