Sunderland children recreate Anglo-Saxon bible

Students (left to right) Jane Usher, Paige Dodd, Aparna Saji, Fiona Felix, Oluchi Davidson and Stephanie Welsh from St Anthony's Academy, Sunderland handing a replica codex based on Venerable Bede's work from St Peters Church which they helped create to Sunderland City Council Senior Project Manager Ian Parkin (right) with RE Teacher Mrs Susannah Handley (2nd left) and Head Teacher Mrs Monica Shepherd (2nd from right) .'Fao Jonathan Kinnair, Sunderland Council #NorthNewsAndPictures/2daymedia
Students (left to right) Jane Usher, Paige Dodd, Aparna Saji, Fiona Felix, Oluchi Davidson and Stephanie Welsh from St Anthony's Academy, Sunderland handing a replica codex based on Venerable Bede's work from St Peters Church which they helped create to Sunderland City Council Senior Project Manager Ian Parkin (right) with RE Teacher Mrs Susannah Handley (2nd left) and Head Teacher Mrs Monica Shepherd (2nd from right) .'Fao Jonathan Kinnair, Sunderland Council #NorthNewsAndPictures/2daymedia
2
Have your say

STUDENTS from two Sunderland schools have helped to create a replica of the earliest surviving bible in the world.

The Codex Amiatinus has been recreated by children from St Anthony’s Girls’ Catholic Academy and Northern Saints CE Primary School.

The new Wearmouth Bible will be presented to the Bishop of Durham next month at St Peter’s Church.

Pupils from the two schools were asked to highlight what their faiths and beliefs mean to them, regardless of religion, using words or drawings.

Susannah Handley, RE co-ordinator at St Anthony’s, said: “The pupils really enjoyed the project. It helped them think about what was important to them and then be creative in how it was interpreted on paper. We’re looking forward to seeing the final version.”

The handover of the bible next month will mark the Feast of St Peter and St Paul and also celebrate the completion of a £1million project by Sunderland City Council to redevelop the exterior of the site, making it more user-friendly and accessible for visitors.

Ian Parkin, senior project manager for Sunderland City Council, said: “St Peter’s Church is a very special site and a key attraction in Sunderland.

“Hopefully, the improvements will encourage more local people, and those from further afield, to come and enjoy the church and its setting, and find out more about its history.

“The support we’ve received from others has been fantastic and the schools have done a brilliant job, we’ve received over 300 pages. The final bible is going to look very impressive.”

St Peter’s Church was part of the Anglo-Saxon monastery of Wearmouth-Jarrow, built in 674AD by Benedict Biscop and is considered one of the key factors in the development of early Christianity.

The landscaping includes a permanent outdoor ‘footprint’ of the original Wearmouth Monastery, plus new seating, new footpaths and resurfacing of existing footpaths.

There will also be a new main gateway, parking areas, lighting, improved signs and links to the riverside, plus the creation of wildflower areas.