Students are on song in Amnesty lyrics contest

TOP THREE: From left, Stephen Kirby, Keiron Cornell, Shaun Donkin-Nunn, Jack Mole, Josh O'Hara, Harry Wilkes and inset, Jay Wardropper.
TOP THREE: From left, Stephen Kirby, Keiron Cornell, Shaun Donkin-Nunn, Jack Mole, Josh O'Hara, Harry Wilkes and inset, Jay Wardropper.
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A GROUP of Wearside students are celebrating being on song in a national competition.

The pupils from St Aidan’s Catholic School are in the top three in the lyrics section of Amnesty International’s Youth Awards.

When we were told the news we were surprised, elated and quite emotional. We really didn’t expect it, but it felt great.

Jack Mole

The awards celebrate young people from seven to 19 years old who creatively interpret a human rights topic through reporting, photography, songwriting and performing, fund-raising and campaigning.

Now in its second year, the Amnesty Youth Awards competition has become extremely popular in schools and colleges across the UK and this year more than 1,300 young people entered.

The group from St Aidan’s were judged for their entry which is entitled ‘Charlie’ by a panel of industry professionals and Amnesty staff members.

Nicky Parker, publisher at Amnesty International UK and one of the judges, said: “This is one of my favourites and I think it is the most creative.”

Jack Mole, Jay Wardropper, Harry Wilkes, Shaun Donkin-Nunn, Keiron Cornell, Stephen Kirby and Josh O’Hara were involved with the piece and were delighted when they found out they were in the top three with their song that tackles the issue of free speech.

Jack said: “When we were told the news we were surprised, elated and quite emotional. We really didn’t expect it, but it felt great.”

Harry, said: “We believe and hope that our song entry will make :an impact for the better. By making people reflect on hatred in the world and how it can easily influence others we hope that people will come together and start thinking of others before themselves.”

Jay said: “Human rights issues are important because they help to stop people being discriminated against. Discrimination can lead to abuse and can lead to people being forced to do something they don’t want to. It is essential that we are taught about rights so we understand their importance and can help to make the world a more peaceful place in future.”

The winner of the Upper Primary and Lower Secondary Lyrics category will be announced at an awards ceremony later this month.