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Pupils explore the food chain

Farmers market held at The Ribbon School, Murton Community Primary school, Barnes Road,  Murton on Wednesday. Pictured l-r are Rosie Symonds, Adam Baker and Molly Dixon.

Farmers market held at The Ribbon School, Murton Community Primary school, Barnes Road, Murton on Wednesday. Pictured l-r are Rosie Symonds, Adam Baker and Molly Dixon.

FROM the farmer’s field to the dinner plate.

Inquisitive children discovered what goes into their evening meal at a special farmers’ market event.

The Ribbon Academy in Murton hosted the event which helped explain what local producers put into their products.

The event was organised by the primary’s School Nutrition Action Group (Snag) which is helping the youngsters learn about the importance of a healthy diet, skills which go into making meals and showing the children where foods come from.

The pupils invited a range of companies to take part in the day.

Those who took up the offer included Broom House Farm in Witton Gilbert, which took along meats, Leechmire Farm, Wingate, which exhibited fruit and vegetables, JR Jams in Newcastle, which offered an insight into how it makes preserves and Robinson’s butchers, also in Wingate, which took along some of its pies.

Year groups also did their bit to show off their creative sides, selling painted plant pots, biscuits, herb gardens, soup and bread and pampering bath salts to the visitors.

The event followed on from a farmers’ market held last year by the family centre linked to the school, also known as Murton Community Primary,

The Snag group decided to build on its success by asking the pupils to play a larger part in organising it to give their learning experience a boost.

Year 3 teacher Kelly Bailey, who leads the Snag team, said: “The children loved it and were really pleased everything they had made was also sold.

“They helped measure and weigh out vegetables and saw how the producers worked.

“It also helped them with their personal and social skills and they chatted away with people from our community, and they really loved it too.
 “They were helping to serve them cups of tea and coffee and the older people also came together and were sitting and talking to each other, so it brought people together.”

Pauliina Pohtola, a teacher from Finland spending time with the school as part of her training, also helped the children plan their market.

Snag has previously held trips out to farms, welcomed a visit by the Soil Association and churned their own butter.

 

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