Industrial heritage is inspiration for Sunderland artwork

Art students, Rebecca Wood, Annie Annis-Clark, Bradley Robinson and Nathan Ridley show their work in progress to Artist, Cerith Wyn Evans as he stops off at Thornhill school to talk to pupils about his work before visiting the city to have a look for a suitable site for his installation as part of the Great North Run culture.
Art students, Rebecca Wood, Annie Annis-Clark, Bradley Robinson and Nathan Ridley show their work in progress to Artist, Cerith Wyn Evans as he stops off at Thornhill school to talk to pupils about his work before visiting the city to have a look for a suitable site for his installation as part of the Great North Run culture.
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A LEADING UK artist is planning a unique piece of work for the industrial streets of Sunderland.

Cerith Wyn Evans popped into a Sunderland school to gauge reaction to plans to install his sculpture this September.

The artist, from South Wales, has been looking for the perfect spot to put up his work, Permit Yourself, as part of the Great North Run Culture programme. After looking at several sites, Cerith has decided to install his work at Alexandra Business Park at Pallion.

He said: “I’m thrilled to be part of this whole project and have enjoyed looking round Sunderland.

“Here, like so much of the country, is filled with massive post-industrial spaces.

“I remember in South Wales as a youngster there were big coal mines and steel works that were being decommissioned, leaving huge spaces in the landscape.

“They are ghost spaces and I’ve found these interesting to look at because no-one really knows what to do with them.

“What I want to do is suspend something in one of these spaces.”

Cerith will return to the city in September to create his masterpiece.

The art, which will be put up for four weeks, has yet to be built but is expected to be a large-scale kinetic sculpture formed from different sized double mirrors assembled as a mobile.

It will have some text cut out of it, meaning as the light bounces off it the text and light will create a pattern.

Cerith said: “It’s really amazing to see and no visitor will see the same sequence of changing light and text so it is constantly changing.

“It’s about how energy and light bounce off each other to create a space that is worth spending a bit of time in.”

During his trip to the city, Cerith stopped off at Thornhill School before the bell went to mark the end of term. He talked to pupils about his art and gave them some top tips on their own creations.

He said: “It was exciting to see what some of the pupils had done and to talk to them about their work.”

Permit Yourself will be put in place from September 15 for four weeks.

Twitter: @sunechocrime