Going quackers for Duck’s help

Durham students raised �40,000 for charity
Durham students raised �40,000 for charity
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GRATEFUL charity workers thanked Durham University students for their latest round of grants.

Durham University Charities Kommittee (Duck) hands out more than £400,000 a year which is raised by students at hundreds of events.

They include the annual plastic Duck race in the River Wear.

Representatives of North East charities gathered at Duck’s offices in Dunelm House, Durham City, to receive their share of £30,000 of funding.

“We will use our money for a series of dance, drama and music workshops,” said Amanda Tweedy of Heel and Toe, which helps children with cerebral palsy from its base in Framwellgate Moor, Durham City.

“Our aim is to run the workshops and then put on a show for Christmas.

“Without the Duck money, these children may not have had had access to music and drama,” she added.

“So it means a great deal and we are very grateful.”

The Friends of Durham Trinity School will use its grant to buy greenhouses and other outdoor equipment for the special school at Aykley Heads, Durham City.

Another organisation with cause to be grateful to Duck is The Learning Library.

“We loan toys and sensory equipment to those with learning disability throughout the county,” said manageress Sheila Harris.

“The grant will enable us to increase our stock of equipment by quite a lot. This will be a great benefit to the approximately 650 members of the library.”

Duck manager Carmen O’Loughlin said: “We support specific charities such as Help for Heroes.

“But we are also keen to support the local community and local causes.

“More than 45 charities applied for the local grants this year which shows how important our work is.”

As well as Duck, Durham Students’ Union is home to more than 200 societies covering a range of activity, including student development, specialist sport, hobbies, and academic societies.

For more about Duck, visit http://Duck.dsu.org.uk/

Twitter: @sunderlandecho