Construction students show off their skills

Clinton Mysleyko, skills show judge with Student of the Year winners Stephen Noble and Tommy Shakesby; and Lynne Hicks, skills show judge.

Clinton Mysleyko, skills show judge with Student of the Year winners Stephen Noble and Tommy Shakesby; and Lynne Hicks, skills show judge.

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STUDENTS have showcased their work to employers at a celebration to mark National Apprenticeship Week.

Three hundred students took part in Sunderland College’s Construction Skills Show, where they demonstrated their abilities to businesses and potential bosses to show the positive impact such courses can have on individuals, businesses and the economy.

Bricklaying students Bradley Timm, Liam Dow, Dan Carney, Quinn Kellett and Lewis Storey with their judge, Peter Whybrow, repairs and maintenance manager at Gentoo.

Bricklaying students Bradley Timm, Liam Dow, Dan Carney, Quinn Kellett and Lewis Storey with their judge, Peter Whybrow, repairs and maintenance manager at Gentoo.

Students on a range of construction courses including plumbing, plastering, painting and decorating, carpentry and joinery, bricklaying, maintenance, electrical and basic craft took part in the skills show.

The finale of the week was a session where industry-specialists judged the finalists and selected three winners from each of the construction department’s eight trade areas.

Plumbing student Stephen Noble, aged 17, won an award for his project and was crowned Student of the Year in building services. He said: “I am really happy to win two awards, but very shocked.

“The skills show has given me the opportunity to speak to employers which will help me when I apply for apprenticeships, and it was great to get feedback from the judges about our work.”

The skills show has given me the opportunity to speak to employers which will help me when I apply for apprenticeships, and it was great to get feedback from the judges about our work.

The college welcomed more than 40 businesses to the judging panel, including Clinton Mysleyko, who began his career as an apprentice joiner at college and is now the director of Fitz Architects.

He said: “Learning a trade gives you a real understanding of construction. Having seen some of the excellent work on show at the event and speaking to the students about their projects, it was obvious to see how passionate they are – I’m sure many of them will go on to work within the construction industry very soon.”