Teen jailed over savage killing of Sunderland dad David Walsh has prison sentence increased

Murder victim David Walsh

Murder victim David Walsh

A teenager locked up for his part in the 'savage' and 'cruel' slaying of a Sunderland dad has had his sentence increased by a third by senior judges.

Dalton Barnett, 19, of Fuller Road, was convicted of manslaughter and violent disorder and got six years in a young offender institution in July.

Dalton Barnett

Dalton Barnett

His father, Charles Lamont, 41, of Villette Road, was found guilty of murdering of 45-year-old David Walsh and violent disorder.

Lamont was jailed for life at Newcastle Crown Court and ordered to serve 13 years behind bars before he could even apply for parole.

The Attorney General Jeremy Wright QC today referred both killer's sentences to the Court of Appeal, in London, arguing they were far too soft.

The Court refused to up Lamont's sentence, saying it was 'low' but not 'unduly lenient'

Charles Lamont

Charles Lamont

But the judges increased Barnett's sentence to nine years.

On November 20 last year, in Canon Cockin Street, Hendon, Mr Walsh's son David Richardson was involved in a confrontation with Barnett.

He was left with facial injuries and called his brother, Kyle Walsh, to tell him what happened.

Kyle got in his van and picked up his dad, David Walsh, on his way to the scene.

Both men were unarmed, Lord Justice Lloyd Jones told the court.

David Walsh demanded to know who had attacked his son.

Lamont came out of an address in Fuller Road and fought with the father and was punched and knocked to the ground.

He went back inside and got a metal bar and Barnett emerged carrying a baseball bat.

They were both attacking David Walsh when, 'without warning', Raymond Brown, then 37, came on the scene with a kitchen knife.

He 'swiftly and savagely' stabbed the victim multiple times, leaving him with 34 separate injuries.

Mr Walsh died as a result of massive blood loss. His family were 'emotionally devastated' by his death.

Brown, of Canon Cockin Street, admitted murder and violent disorder and got life with a minimum of 26 years.

Robert Smith QC, for the Attorney General, argued the punishments imposed on Lamont and Barnett were nowhere near tough enough.

But Toby Hedworth QC, for Barnett, insisted that his sentence was 'fair and appropriate' given his youth and immaturity.

Alistair McDonald QC, for Lamont, said his 13-year minimum term was 'appropriate' and 'just'. Lamont suffers from a chronic bowel condition which will make his years in prison tougher, he added.

Lord Justice Lloyd Jones said Mr Walsh suffered 'a dreadful, cruel death when repeatedly stabbed by Brown'.

The appeal judge, who was sitting with Mr Justice Dingemans and Judge Mark Brown, said Lamont's minimum term would not be upped.

But he agreed with the Attorney-General that the sentence imposed on Barnett was too short.

After the trial at Newcastle Crown Court, Mr Walsh’s brother Billy, 55, who sat through all of the five-week hearing said the sentences were "too lenient".

He said at the time: "It’s a disgrace. Those three killed my brother and they have only got 45 years between them."

Mr Walsh added that the length of sentences given to Lamont and Barnett did not go far enough.

He added: "I don’t think Brown or Lamont have got anywhere near what they should have done. "I think Lamont should have got 20 years and Dalton Barnett should have got 15 years. 


"What they got is too lenient. Barnett has taken a man’s life and he is only having to serve six years. It’s no deterrent. I can’t believe it."