Ian Brady: My time inside Durham with the Krays

Court artist sketch by Elizabeth Cook of moors murderer Ian Brady appearing via video link at Manchester Civil Justice Centre.
Court artist sketch by Elizabeth Cook of moors murderer Ian Brady appearing via video link at Manchester Civil Justice Centre.
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MOORS murderer Ian Brady has told his mental health tribunal about his time in Durham Prison.

The 75-year-old child killer was speaking in public at length for the first time since he was jailed for life in 1966 as he gave evidence at Ashworth Hospital in Merseyside, where he has been held since 1985.

Brady wants to leave Ashworth and serve the rest of his sentence in the prison system, where he believes he would be able to starve himself to death. He has been fed through a tube since 1999, when he went on hunger strike.

Eleanor Grey QC, counsel for Ashworth, began her cross-examination by asking Brady about his memories of his time at Durham Prison which she described as a “little partial”.

Brady said: “During the first two years they tried to clamp down on Cat A’ers and they were all Cat A’ers – the Krays, Train Robbers, McVicar...

“What they had us doing, mail bags in a cell. They thought they would get away with this with people serving 30 years and natural life.”

Miss Grey asked if he was scared of other prisoners and quoted the prison record for Durham from December 1967, which read: “Brady is acutely aware of the hostility of other prisoners towards him. They constantly shout things and bang his door and he’s afraid of being attacked.

“I noticed every time footsteps are outside his door, he was apprehensive. He’s refused to take exercise. I think he’s scared of violence on the way to the yard and sick of abuse hurled at him.”

Brady admitted “taking precautions” but said it was “too complex to explain”.

But he went on to say the conditions were “out of this world”.

“Ronnie Kray was cooking for his landing, I was cooking for mine,” he said. “We were sick of eating steak.”

Brady and his partner, Myra Hindley, were convicted of luring children and teenagers to their deaths, with their victims sexually tortured before being buried on Saddleworth Moor.

Hindley died in hospital, still a prisoner, in November 2002 aged 60.

The judgment of the panel will be released at a later date yet to be fixed.