Driver crashed into house after seizure caused by m-cat and cannabis binge

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A DRIVER crashed his car into a house while having an epileptic seizure brought on by a drugs binge.

James Pennick, 22, started fitting when driving friends to a party at 3pm on December 20, last year, Sunderland magistrates heard.

The m-cat had such an effect, along with the lack of sleep, that when he was driving he had an epileptic seizure at the wheel and that’s what caused the accident

Defence solicitor Tracey Kyle

Prosecutor Lee Poppett said Pennick blacked out and plunged his vehicle into the rear of a property in Oxford Street, Pallion.

The cost of repairing the damage was unclear, but it is believed the home owner was insured.

“A collision seems to have occurred where a Peugeot 106 has collided with the rear of a property,” Mr Poppett said.

“Police spoke to the defendant in the rear of the ambulance. They believed he was under the influence of drugs at the time.

“He was taken to Sunderland Royal Hospital due to his injuries he sustained himself due to the collision.”

Pennick, who works as a kitchen porter in a pub, tested positive for mephedrone – or m-cat – and cannabis.

He said he had consumed £40 worth of cannabis along with “stacks” of m-cat, which had “knocked him ill” for two days. On the day of the crash, he had smoked three joints.

Pennick, of Attwood Terrace, Tudhoe, County Durham, admitted driving whilst unfit through drugs.

Tracey Kyle, defending, said he had taken cannabis for a number of years to help with anxiety and depression.

“The m-cat had such an effect, along with the lack of sleep, that when he was driving he had an epileptic seizure at the wheel and that’s what caused the accident,” Ms Kyle said. “Luckily nobody was hurt and the defendant suffered minor injuries. Because of the seizures he has had to surrender his licence of medical grounds.”

Pennick was banned from driving for two years and was told to carry out 100 hours’ unpaid work and pay £85 in costs and a £60 surcharge.