Clare’s Law sees Northumbria Police receive 230 requests to reveal a partner’s past

CLARE'S LAW ... allows police to warn people if their partners have a history of domestic violence. It is named after Clare Wood, whose father Michael Brown, pictured, campaigned for it for two years.
CLARE'S LAW ... allows police to warn people if their partners have a history of domestic violence. It is named after Clare Wood, whose father Michael Brown, pictured, campaigned for it for two years.
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PEOPLE in Sunderland worried their partner may have an abusive past are seeking the help of a law aimed at revealing their violent history.

Clare’s Law was brought in last year giving police powers to disclose information as to whether a person has been involved in domestic violence in the past.

The scheme rolled out across the country last March, also saw the launch of Domestic Violence Protection Orders (DVPOs) used to prevent a perpetrator from contacting their victim.

Northumbria Police has received 230 applications – including some from people living in Sunderland – for information under Clare’s Law, of which 37 disclosures were made. This figure includes people provided with information under the “right to ask rule” as well as those approached by police under the “right to know” basis.

During the same time, officers made requests for 122 DVPO orders to magistrates of which 95 were granted.

Assistant Chief Constable Winton Keenen said: “Clare’s Law has been introduced to help people who think their partner may be acting in a way that suggests they are somebody who is violent.

“We have seen a very positive response since the launch of Clare’s Law last year and have received more than 200 applications

“So far we have made 37 disclosures about people with a violent history and this has helped people get away from potentially abusive relationships, which may in turn have saved their lives.

Clare’s Law, named after Clare Wood, was brought in following her murder in 2009. The 36-year-old was strangled and set on fire by her ex-boyfriend George Appleton at her home in Salford, Greater Manchester. Unbeknown to Miss Wood, he had a history of violence towards women.