Chicks’ cracking Easter

The Black Swans with one of the cygnets which hatched on Easter Sunday at the Washington Wetland Centre.
The Black Swans with one of the cygnets which hatched on Easter Sunday at the Washington Wetland Centre.
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WETLANDS staff got an eggs-tra special surprise when two real Easter eggs hatched.

 Two fluffy black swan cygnets decided to make their appearance at Washington’s Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust (WWT), over the weekend.

 The pretty pair was first spotted in the nest by wardens on Sunday, and by Monday could be seen enjoying the sunshine while taking their first foray into the water.

 Black swans are native to the wetlands of south western and eastern Australia, and the species has one of the longest necks of all swans, which is curved into an S-shape.

 Its trumpet-like call is very distinctive, as is the tendency to whistle ferociously if disturbed while nesting or breeding, which the parents of the new cygnets at WWT are proving.

 Anyone who would like to see the happy family for themselves can visit them in the centre’s Close Encounters area, which is home to many other rare and endangered wildfowl.

 Centre manager Jane Ramshaw said: “During the holidays, visitors can experience the fascinating progress of WWT’s real-life Easter eggs, with ducklings, goslings and cygnets all starting to hatch.

 “WWT Washington is home to many rare species, giving people a unique opportunity to meet the birds that they are actually helping to protect.”