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Teenagers fight £3.4million home plans at Sunderland Bronze Age site

Sisters Lilly (13) (left) and Emmie (14) Thompson, of Tudor Grove, Humbledon, Sunderland, who have started a petition to save Humbledon Hill

Sisters Lilly (13) (left) and Emmie (14) Thompson, of Tudor Grove, Humbledon, Sunderland, who have started a petition to save Humbledon Hill

TWO teenage girls are spearheading a campaign to stop a development of eco homes on a Bronze Age site behind their Sunderland home.

Emmie Thompson, 14, and her 13-year-old sister Lilly set up social media accounts and designed posters to oppose the proposal by Sunderland-born architect Richard Marsden to build 13 bespoke homes on Humbledon Hill.

The girls, who attend St Anthony’s Girls’ Catholic Academy, are concerned that the tranquillity and heritage of the land will be lost, as well as the many wild animals that live there.

Almost a hundred posters have been put up on lampposts and placed inside businesses, while the online petition arranged by the girls at www.gopetition.com/petitions/save-humbledon-hill.html has already attracted more than 150 signatures.

Emmie has set up a facebook page called Save Humbledon Hill and a Twitter account @Save_Our_Hill

Their love for the hill, which backs onto their back garden in Tudor Grove, runs in the family. In 2000, the Echo pictured their older brother Jay, 17, when he was just three years old, holding up a sign during a protest against previous plans for the site, which were later scrapped.

“We both thought we wanted to contribute to the campaign and help save the back field and the wildlife there,” Emmie told the Echo. “Lilly likes to take pictures of the wildlife.

“We came up with the idea together about using social media and creating the posters to raise awareness.”

Lilly, who is a keen photographer, is anxious to protect the animals and the open views of the hill from her bedroom window.

“My bedroom looks out the back and I look out of my window to see if there are any animals out and I get my camera out,” she added.

Their mum Tracey, 46, a housewife, said not many people appear to know of 
the proposals and explained that she had only seen a handful of notices on lampposts.

Tracey, who is married to Stephen, an IT manager at Nissan, said: “The girls wanted to do something to help.

“I’m not a social media person and the girls came up with the idea all by themselves.”

 

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