Product recall demanded on child’s car seat as customers urged 'don't buy'

Nuna Rebl i-Size child car seat in rearward-facing mode and right, image of the Nuna Rebl seat base when it broke, sending the seat backwards in some of Which?s frontal-impact tests. Images courtesy: Which.co.uk

Nuna Rebl i-Size child car seat in rearward-facing mode and right, image of the Nuna Rebl seat base when it broke, sending the seat backwards in some of Which?s frontal-impact tests. Images courtesy: Which.co.uk

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Campaigners are demanding a recall of the Nuna Rebl i-Size car seat after it failed the Which? safety tests.

The car seat was scored at 0% and downgraded to the level of "don't buy" by the consumer product reviewer on October 25.

Don't buy this product

Although the product previously passed the regulation tests for UN ECE R129 (for use from birth to four years) which was also confirmed by Which?, the car seat failed its safety test when rear-facing.

When in the reward position the car seat could not withstand the test collison and the metal frame of the car seat base broke.

“The crash-test results indicate that an older child using the Nuna Rebl i-Size child car seat in rear-facing mode could be at high risk of serious injury in the front crashes we simulated,” Which? advise on their website. “We don't recommend you buy this seat if you're planning on using it as an extended rearward-facing car seat.”

The Which? car seat safety tests are more severe than the UN legal minimum standard tests however their experts believe it gives a more accurate reflection of what would happen in a car crash.

Which? says, “Our child car seat test results reveal big differences between seats. Some protect babies and children well, but others expose them to the risk of serious injury or even death. The best child car seats will provide protection from both front- and side-impact crashes – two of the most common types of crash.”

Risk of death

Natalie Moring from Northampton who created the petition on Change.org explains her concerns.

“For all children who are either too young to be allowed to ride forward facing, or for the multitude of parents (including myself) who choose to do extended rear facing and keep their child rear-facing until the age of 4, driving over the speed of 30mph poses a serious risk of injury and even death,” Natalie says.

“I am therefore calling on Nuna to issue a product recall, and allow any person who is unhappy with allowing their child to continue using the Rebl to get a full refund or exchange.”

Incredibly disappointed

Nuna have advised to approach the appropriate retailer for a refund or exchange however Natalie states that several retailers are refusing to refund or exchange without an official product recall.

“I am incredibly disappointed that Nuna have marketed themselves as one of the safest car seats on the market (with the price tag to match),” says Natalie. “Yet they are content with only passing the minimum safety requirements.”