VIDEO: Sunderland first-aiders doing it ‘hard and fast to Stayin’ Alive’, just like Vinnie Jones

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IF you know how Stayin’ Alive by the Bee Gees goes then you have the potential to save a life, according to the British Heart Foundation.

The charity has launched a new advertising campaign starring footballer-turned-movie hardman Vinnie Jones and his pals performing life-saving chest compressions on a man in an abandoned warehouse.

Vinnie Jones is fronting a new lifesaving campaign. Below, Ian Cooper preforming CPR watched by others on the 1st Aid course held recently at the Business & Innovation Centre, Southwick, Sunderland.

Vinnie Jones is fronting a new lifesaving campaign. Below, Ian Cooper preforming CPR watched by others on the 1st Aid course held recently at the Business & Innovation Centre, Southwick, Sunderland.

Vinnie encourages us to do away with the notion of mouth-to-mouth while performing CPR, instead telling us to concentrate on effective chest compressions to the beat of the famous disco hit, saying: “It’s not as hard as it looks.”

The campaign came about after research by the BHF, which showed that four out of 10 people are worried about performing CPR in case they make a mistake and a fifth of people are none too keen on the idea of performing mouth to mouth at all.

In the North East, the numbers are even more damning.

According to the survey, 59 per cent people in the region either would not perform CPR on somebody they find to be in need of it and 64 per cent admitted they did not know how fast chest compressions have to be to have an effect.

Ian Cooper preforming CPR watched by others on the 1st Aid course held rtecently at the Business & Innovation  Centre, Southwick, Sunderland. watching left is Ian Bell 1st Aid Trainer Assessor.

Ian Cooper preforming CPR watched by others on the 1st Aid course held rtecently at the Business & Innovation Centre, Southwick, Sunderland. watching left is Ian Bell 1st Aid Trainer Assessor.

Crucially, however, almost three quarters of people said that they would like to know more about CPR or have some proper training.

Now, the foundation is looking to ease the apprehension felt by people and give the encouragement that anybody can save a life, even if you have to “give the kiss a miss”.

“The kiss of life can often be daunting for untrained bystanders who want to help when someone has collapsed with a cardiac arrest,” said Ellen Mason, Senior Cardiac Nurse at the British Heart Foundation in a statement.

“Hands-only CPR should give lots of people the confidence and know-how to help save someone in cardiac arrest, the ultimate medical emergency.

“It’s been shown that hard, fast and uninterrupted chest compressions are better than stopping compressions for ineffective rescue breaths.”