Travel: Take a look inside the Star Wars Identities exhibition

� & TM 2017 Lucasfilm Ltd. All Rights Reserved. Used Under Authorization.
� & TM 2017 Lucasfilm Ltd. All Rights Reserved. Used Under Authorization.
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I’m an Ewok, according to the Star Wars Identities exhibition.

Inspired by a galaxy far, far away, the display at the O2 in London, which is running until September, is drawing in Star Wars fans from far and wide.

� & TM 2017 Lucasfilm Ltd. All Rights Reserved. Used Under Authorization.

� & TM 2017 Lucasfilm Ltd. All Rights Reserved. Used Under Authorization.

Rather than just a display of characters and costumes from the iconic film franchise, however, the exhibition is an interactive experience which encourages visitors to get involved through a series of touch screens, which give you the chance to answer questions and input information which is used to generate your own Star Wars identity.

Some people emerged as warriors, others as princess rulers, I was a slightly-less glamorous Ewok. But, whether you’re a big or small identity in this blend of your own characteristics with a fictional character, it’s still great fun waiting for your name to pop up on the giant screen at the end.

Back to the beginning and as you enter the display visitors are given a wristband which they can swipe to access questions about what forces shape them.

As soon as the first few bars of that iconic soundtrack kicks in you’re transported from London to the land of Luke Skywalker and lightsabers.

� & TM 2017 Lucasfilm Ltd. All Rights Reserved. Used Under Authorization.

� & TM 2017 Lucasfilm Ltd. All Rights Reserved. Used Under Authorization.

As well as the interactive element, the exhibition features about 200 original objects from the Lucas Museum of Narrative Art and digs deep into cinematic legend George Lucas’ inspiration for his era-defining work.

Highlights include original sketches, as well as some of the few remaining artefacts from the cantina scene in Star Wars: A New Hope, a revolutionary idea at the time which would give cinema-goers the chance to see aliens in their everyday environment.

The display explains how it was one of the first ideas Lucas had for the film and how he wanted to transport his audience into a place where humans are the outsiders and aliens are just having a drink.

There’s also the chance to see the costume worn by Jeremy Bulloch as Boba Fett who, though he speaks just 29 words in the classic trilogy, developed a huge cult following.

� & TM 2017 Lucasfilm Ltd. All Rights Reserved. Used Under Authorization.

� & TM 2017 Lucasfilm Ltd. All Rights Reserved. Used Under Authorization.

You can also go from looking at early sketches of Luke and Leia through to one of her most famous costumes, that worn by Carrie Fisher while the princess was imprisoned by Jabba the Hutt.

Modern highlights include costumes worn by Natalie Portman as Padmé Amidala in the prequel trilogy, many of which doffed their cap to those worn by Leia.

Everyone’s favourite pint-sized philosopher Yoda is also in a display about how the mentor figure came into being.

The display shows the early sketches of a character who would express simple truths in a child-like manner, like a little Dalai Lama.

� & TM 2017 Lucasfilm Ltd. All Rights Reserved. Used Under Authorization.

� & TM 2017 Lucasfilm Ltd. All Rights Reserved. Used Under Authorization.

Lucas would read the words around the sketch out of order, which is how Yoda’s distinctive speech pattern came about. His eyes, meanwhile, were modelled on those of Albert Einstein.

You can also chart Anakin’s decent to the dark side, from the costume worn by Hayden Christensen as Jedi Knight Anakin Skywalker, with the dark browns of the costume said to signal the beginning of his journey to becoming Darth, through to the actual Darth Vadar costume worn by David Prowse in Return of the Jedi.

The latter looks just as impressive in real life as it does on the screen – even if it was cobbled together from available bits and pieces at the time, including a Second World War German helmet, a monk’s cloak and a gas mask.

The exhibition has divided its study of human identity into three major themes, each presented in a separate zone: the characters’ origins, the influences that shaped them, and the personal choices that altered their lives. Within these themes, 10 components of human identity are explored including species, origins, parents, culture, friends, occupation and values.

Science-based video clips explain how each component influences our identity and the content was developed with experts from fields including psychology and genetics.

According to George Lucas himself: “Since Star Wars takes place in a fantasy world, the characters need to be identifiable so that the audience can connect to them.

“These larger-than-life characters come complete with friends, enemies, values, and beliefs. This exhibition examines how the Star Wars characters are like us, what we may have in common, and what makes up our individual identities.”

•For complete schedule and box office information, visit www.theo2.co.uk/starwars