Sunderland singer serenades shoppers

Local musician Terry Gorman, from Washington, pictured with Zoe Thomas from the Teenage Cancer Trust as he serenades Nicolette Roberts, of Kayll Road, as she shops at the Silksworth Lane branch of Homebase. Terry was helping the cancer charity with their latest fund-raising initiative.
Local musician Terry Gorman, from Washington, pictured with Zoe Thomas from the Teenage Cancer Trust as he serenades Nicolette Roberts, of Kayll Road, as she shops at the Silksworth Lane branch of Homebase. Terry was helping the cancer charity with their latest fund-raising initiative.
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MUSIC filled the aisles at a DIY store as a Wearside singer serenaded shoppers.

Terry Gorman entertained customers at Sunderland’s Homebase store as he helped launch the company’s campaign to raise cash for the Teenage Cancer Trust.

The Silksworth Lane store is taking part in the Homebase Entertainment Exchange, asking customers to turn their unwanted CDs and DVDs into cash for the cancer charity.

Until May 31, Homebase stores across the country will run the music and film recycling drive, in partnership with the website company, musicMagpie.co.uk,

Shoppers are invited to drop off their unwanted CDs and DVDs in the designated Entertainment Exchange drop off bins and musicMagpie will provide a donation per item collected to the charity to help young people who are battling cancer.

To celebrate the launch of the scheme in Sunderland, acoustic singer songwriter, Terry, of Washington, got customers into the musical donating spirit, by performing at the store.

Mel Martin, sales manager at the store, said: “The Homebase Entertainment Exchange is a perfect excuse to have a good spring clean. We want everyone to bring in all their old CDs and DVDS and turn their clutter into cash for a good cause.”

Teenage Cancer Trust is the official charity partner of Homebase and staff have already raised £1.5million.

Teenage Cancer Trust is the only UK charity dedicated to improving the quality of life and chances of survival for young people with cancer aged between 13 and 24.

The charity builds specialist units within NHS hospitals, bringing young people together to be treated by teenage cancer experts in a place designed to feel like a home-from-home.

One of the charity’s aims is that every young person with cancer has access to this specialist support, no matter where they live.