Sunderland is knitting for gold

From: Vanessa Ware [mailto:Vanessa_W@SearchPress.com] 'Sent: 30 August 2011 15:48'To: Linda Colling'Subject: More images from Knit for Gold
From: Vanessa Ware [mailto:Vanessa_W@SearchPress.com] 'Sent: 30 August 2011 15:48'To: Linda Colling'Subject: More images from Knit for Gold
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A WOOLLY exhibition is going global.

Knitting for Gold, which has been on show at Monkwearmouth Station Museum is heading to the Sport and Olympic Museum in Cologne, Germany.

From: Vanessa Ware [mailto:Vanessa_W@SearchPress.com] 'Sent: 30 August 2011 15:48'To: Linda Colling'Subject: More images from Knit for Gold

From: Vanessa Ware [mailto:Vanessa_W@SearchPress.com] 'Sent: 30 August 2011 15:48'To: Linda Colling'Subject: More images from Knit for Gold

Sue McBride from Fatfield, Washington, who knitted the figures, said: “I was very surprised when the woman asked me if they could take the figures to the museum.

“She got in touch with me through Ravelry knitting website to ask me, and said that they would be good for their museum’s knitted display.”

The knitted figures have been on display at the museum since June.

“I knitted all 20 figures myself, from the book I wrote Knitting for Gold,” she said.

Customs House knitting team member Sue McBride has written a book called Knitting for Gold for the Olympics.

Customs House knitting team member Sue McBride has written a book called Knitting for Gold for the Olympics.

“They were only supposed to be at the museum for the Olympics, but they asked me if they could keep them a little longer.”

Sue’s book Knitting for Gold was released earlier this year, and has already sold about 9,000 copies.

“I was asked to write the book,” said the 56-year-old. “And it was the first one I’ve ever written.

“I’ve already got an idea for another book, using the same figures.

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“I’ll find out exactly how many copies it’s sold in December, but up till now I think it is about 9,000.”

Sue, who lived in the United States for a few years, has honed her knitting skills over the years, and doesn’t seem surprised that it’s coming back into fashion.

“I got into knitting when I was tiny,” she said. “My gran taught me. And when I lived in America I managed a wool shop. I think it’s becoming more popular again because while some of the wool you can buy is really expensive, you can make individual items of clothing really cheaply, and no one else will have them.

“And also there is a huge campaign now for British wool, to start using it.

“It used to just be acrylics but now there is some really nice British wool.”

Sue, who has two children, Shaun, 30, who lives in Washington DC, in the United States, and Jenny, 28, who lives in Washington with Sue, is part of the knitting group the Materialistics which is based at the Customs House in South Shields.

The group first found fame more than three years ago when they knitted a 21-foot boat, and have since gone on to created knitted versions of famous artworks, including Sunflowers by Van Gogh and The Scream by Edvard Munch.

Sue said: “It’s really coming back into fashion. We do huge exhibitions and they’re really popular.

“I’ve even been asked to go into some schools and teach knitting classes, so I’ve been really busy.”

Sue’s daughter Jenny isn’t as enthusiastic with the needles as her knitting expert mum though.

Sue said: “She can knit – she knitted me a really nice blue dress – but she doesn’t.”

To see Sue’s exhibition before it moves to the Cologne Sport and Olympic Museum, visit Monkwearmouth Station Museum until November 4.

For more details, call 567 7075 or visit www.twmuseums.org.uk/monkwearmouth

Twitter: @Monica__Turnbull