11 of Wearside’s worst winters - could this year make the list?

Winter Wonderland - a snowman-topped car drives through Fulwell in a winter of yesteryear.
Winter Wonderland - a snowman-topped car drives through Fulwell in a winter of yesteryear.
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Sunderland has just shivered through its first real snowfall of the winter - so just how much worse can things get?

From 10ft snow drifts, to electricity blackouts and food shortages - Wearsiders really did suffer through winters of the past...

Let it snow... A blizzard-hit Sunderland.

Let it snow... A blizzard-hit Sunderland.

1: 1958: Blizzards brought snowdrifts of up to 10ft - and snowballs stopped play when Sunderland took on Sheffield Wednesday on March 8. Angry supporters lobbed snowballs at the Sunderland players after Wednesday went 3-1 following an own goal.

2: The Big Freeze of 1962/63 saw Wearside shiver through its coldest winter for 200 years. A 36-hour blizzard brought white hell to Wearside.

3: 1911: Sunderland AFC hero Charlie Buchan bought a warm winter coat when he signed for Sunderland . The £6 he paid for the overcoat proved money well spent - as it snowed for the first four days of his time in Sunderland.

4: There was a White Christmas in 1961, but the weather brought frozen pipes, 10ft drifts, 50mph blizzards and left Sunderland cut off.

Lambton Staiths in the snow.

Lambton Staiths in the snow.

5: 1933: Blizzards lasting for 48 hours left Wearsiders stranded without electricity or gas.

6: 1895: Snow began falling on Sunderland at 5am on February 5 and, by 9am, the streets were covered in a foot of the white stuff. An army of unemployed men were rounded up by the council to clear the town. The horse-drawn carriage service had to be cancelled.

7: The winter of 1815/16 saw 1,800 freeze to death across the country - and brought corn riots to Sunderland in October 1816, when the price of goods rocketed sky high.

8: Schools closed, trams ground to a halt and people had to dig their way out of their homes during November 1941. But, because there was a war on, the Government banned the publication of any snow photos - just in case it tipped off Hitler about the severe weather.

Warden Lane in the snow in bygone days.

Warden Lane in the snow in bygone days.

9: Wearsiders went to work in sunshine, but struggled home in snow in February 1953. The sky at midday, according to the Echo, was as black as night. The winter wasn’t, however, as bad as that of 1947 - which saw heavy snow combined with a post-war fuel shortage bring misery to many.

10: Blizzards covered Wearside in several feet on snow on January 4, 1922. Just down the coast, at Whitby, a “mountainous sea” left the quay submerged.

11: Snow falls of up to 4ft hit Wearside in 1940/1, but Sunderland’s trams managed to push on through - after special snow ploughs were fitted to them.

Christ Church in the snow in days gone by.

Christ Church in the snow in days gone by.

A snowy bygone view of Sunderland Museum.

A snowy bygone view of Sunderland Museum.