New York artist gives talk at National Glass Centre

New York based artist Joe Winter who is giving a talk at the National Glass Centre where his work is being displayed. His work uses glass objects to transform light sensitive paper.
New York based artist Joe Winter who is giving a talk at the National Glass Centre where his work is being displayed. His work uses glass objects to transform light sensitive paper.
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IT might look like a desk tray, but an acclaimed New York artist will today give a talk at The National Glass Centre about his latest work.

Joe Winter, from Long Island City, has had an exhibition commissioned by the centre.

Art work from Joe Winter's exhibition which is being displayed at The National Glass Centre this month.

Art work from Joe Winter's exhibition which is being displayed at The National Glass Centre this month.

The exhibit is part of an ongoing project called History of Light.

Joe, who holds a BA from Brown University and an Master of Fine Arts from the University of California, has had his work displayed in Canada, the UK and Europe.

While it might look a little odd, Joe will explain all when he arrives on Wearside. This is the first time Joe has given an artist’s talk in the UK since he studied as an exchange student at the Slade School of Art in London almost 10 years ago.

The exhibition has been curated by Sarah Cook and is supported by the University of Sunderland and Crumb, the resource for curators of new media art.

Sarah, a reader in curatorial practice and new media art at the University of Sunderland, said: “In this new work, Joe has focused on the relation between glass and various histories of image-making.”

Joe’s work will be displayed in the Centre’s Long Gallery and uses glass sheets created by glass designer Cate Watkinson to reflect, refract or focus ambient light.

Sarah added: “The glass plates and coloured-craft paper are held in objects modelled after standard desktop document trays, a familiar office holding area for letters, notes and memos.

“Re-imagined to be adjustable in relation to the sun, the trays are grouped together to suggest an array of solar panels or an astronomical monument.

“The resulting abstract images accumulate in number, and yet risk fading to invisibility over time.”

Since the exhibition opened earlier this month, a series of abstract images has been slowly evolving through the interaction of light, paper, glass, and time.

Sarah said: “With these experiments, rather than regarding the image as something to be fixed and preserved, like a photograph, the image becomes an entirely provisional structure, always in the process of being made, unmade, or remade.”

Joe’s talk takes place today at 6pm at the centre.

The exhibition continues until May 20.

Twitter: @sunechohannah