Illuminating exhibition opens in build-up to Lindisfarne Gospels arrival

Exhibition inspired by Hoily Island and the North East coast opens at the Durham World Heritager Site Vistor centre, on Thrusday. Titled 'Illumination: More than the Sum of Parts' by artist Judith Hurst and will be on display throughout August. Pictured lokking at one is the exhibits is Melanie Owen of the Visitors Centre.

Exhibition inspired by Hoily Island and the North East coast opens at the Durham World Heritager Site Vistor centre, on Thrusday. Titled 'Illumination: More than the Sum of Parts' by artist Judith Hurst and will be on display throughout August. Pictured lokking at one is the exhibits is Melanie Owen of the Visitors Centre.

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AN exhibition of modern illuminated manuscripts has opened.

The illuminated – or decorated – vellum manuscripts by artist Judith Hurst anticipate the arrival in Durham next year of perhaps the most famous manuscript of them all, the Lindisfarne Gospels.

Judith drew the inspiration for her work from Holy Island and the Northumberland coast.

“Observing connections with the patterns of nature is my main focus,” she said. “A residency on Holy Island last year enabled me to explore many aspects of this.

“The eddies and currents of water as tides change, the movement of seaweed and marine life and the textures of sand, rock and pebbles.

“Humans have expressed and recognised these eternal patterns in many ways such as the curves and swirls of Celtic and Islamic images, and the patterns found in science and mathematics.”

l Illumination: More than the Sum of their Parts, is open daily until August 31 at the World Heritage Site Visitor Centre in Owengate, Durham City, which is the steep, cobbled street leading up to Palace Green. Admission free.

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THE organisers behind a ground-breaking exhibition of the Lindisfarne Gospels promise it will show the “wonder and awe” of the world-famous manuscript.

After years of campaigning, the manuscript, along with the seventh-century St Cuthbert’s Gospel, will go on display at Durham University’s Palace Green Library next July, after an agreement with the British Library, in London.

Dr Claire Breay, lead curator for medieval and earlier manuscripts at the British Library, said: “The Lindisfarne Gospels are a world treasure and this project has given us the opportunity to bring them back to the North East so large numbers of people will have the opportunity to view them and interact with them.”

The Gospels, created by monks on Northumberland’s Holy Island in AD700, were carried for 200 years around the region together with the body of St Cuthbert before reaching Durham in AD995, where they remained until the Reformation.

For more information, visit www.lindisfarnegospels.com.