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Wearside Echoes: Looking to the past to mark the future

JULY: Outtersides grocery shop. Situated on the corner of Dawson Terrace and Blythe Street, it offered villagers the finest Danish and Irish butters.

JULY: Outtersides grocery shop. Situated on the corner of Dawson Terrace and Blythe Street, it offered villagers the finest Danish and Irish butters.

TODAY we take a second look at the new South Hylton calendar for 2013.

Shops, pubs, ships and charabancs all feature in the calendar produced by South Hylton Local History Society – as well as river scenes and railways.

“The village has a wealth of history, and we have tried to reflect that,” said Doug Scrafton, secretary of the group. “Our pictures show it changing face over the years.”

It is believed the story of South Hylton could go as far back as 2,000 BC, following the discovery of a Neolithic dugout canoe in the bed of the River Wear in 1885.

Official records, however, only date from the 12th century – when the Hilton family became established on the north bank of the Wear from 1157 and Romanus of Hylton held the title.

“The fortunes of South Hylton were bound to the Hilton family for centuries, until the estate was sold off in about 1750,” said Doug. “But the name is a relatively recent coinage.

“It didn’t come into regular use until the 18th century. Prior to this, it was known as Ford or Hylton Ferry. The Manor of Ford was once part of the Hilton Castle estates.

“The name of Ford was preserved in the name of our school until the 1950s and in the parish name until 1967 – when Borough of Sunderland took over from Durham County Council.”

South Hylton was originally a scattered collection of farmsteads, but gradually evolved into an industrial village during the early 1700s – with thriving factories and shipyards.

“Villagers maintain it is different to anywhere else. It was never a typical English village, nor a mining village. It was a product of the Industrial Revolution,” said Doug. Among the highlights of the 2013 calendar is a photo of the Danube, which overturned in a freak swell in 1906. Behind the wreck is the Shipwright’s Arms – Sunderland’s oldest pub.

An image of Outterside’s grocery shop is also included. Situated on the corner of Dawson Terrace and Blythe Street, it offered villagers the “finest Danish and Irish butters”.

“James Outterside lived at 19 Dawson Terrace,” said Doug.

“He owned cottages in Ford Terrace, Wear Street and Blythe Street. His annual rent income was £250 – over £100,000 today.”

Other pictures include long-gone houses, the Paper Mill incline, a low-tide river scene and the second charabanc bought by Mr W. H, Jolly – of local Jolly bus fame.

“We don’t have the exact date the vehicle was purchased, but it was between 1922 and 1930 and had the registration BR 5858. Sadly, the last Jolly bus ran in 1995,” said Doug.

l The £4 calendar is on sale at His and Hers Hairdressers in High Street, Union Street chemist, Village News and Costcutters.

It can also be ordered from Doug on 534 4251. Further pictures of South and North Hylton can be found on the society’s website at: http://www.shlhs.com

 

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